Imperial Palace・ Tokyo Sta.・ Hibiya Event Special Exhibition ""Body/Form—Anatomical Wall Charts from the University of Tokyo"

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Intermediatheque Natural History Series No.7

Event duration

  • 03
    March
  • SUN
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INFORMATION

Date/Time From Saturday, March 6, 2021
11:00 am - 6:00 pm (open until 8:00 pm on Fridays and Saturdays)
*Opening hours are subject to change.
Closed Mondays (or the following Tuesday if Monday is a National Holiday.) and new year holidays.
May close irregularly.
Venue Intermediatheque 3F [MODULE]
(KITTE 2-3F, 2-7-2 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo)
Organizer The University Museum, the University of Tokyo(UMUT)
Co-organizer            Medical Museum, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo            
Admission Fee Free of charge
Access 1-minute walk from JR / Subway "Tokyo sta." South Exit directly connected from Subway "Tokyo sta."
2-minute walk from Subway "Nijubashimae Station" Exit 4
Contact 050-5541-8600(Hello Dial)
Website http://www.intermediatheque.jp/                                        

Special Exhibition

"Body/Form—Anatomical Wall Charts from the University of Tokyo"

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Poster of the Intermediatheque Special Exhibition "Body/Form — Anatomical Wall Charts from the University of Tokyo" © Intermediatheque
 

For the seventh instalment of the ongoing Intermediatheque Natural History Series, a special exhibition entitled "Body/Form—Anatomical Wall Charts from the University of Tokyo" is currently being held. This exhibition makes the anatomical wall charts from the University of Tokyo's Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine collection available to the public, as an opportunity to rethink pictorial representations of the human body in modern anatomical charts. The exhibition is held as a series, each time featuring around twenty example of hand-drawn historical wall charts.



the site of the venue

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View of the Intermediatheque Special Exhibition "Body/Form — Anatomical Wall Charts from the University of Tokyo" © Intermediatheque / Museography © UMUT works


■Main Exhibits

Muscles of Head                              Date unknown/Hanging scroll, watercolor on paper/787x1234mm/Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo
Muscle of Right Lower Leg Date unknown/Hanging scroll, watercolor on paper/784x1220mm/Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo
Coronal Section of Head Date unknown/Hanging scroll, watercolor on paper/788x1236mm/Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo

In Japan, Kaitai Shinsho (New Text on Anatomy), published in 1774 by the likes of SUGITA Genpaku as a Japanese translation of a Dutch anatomy book originally written in German and commonly referred to as Taheru Anatomia, commenced the importation of modern anatomy from the West. As opposed to the Western style of anatomical illustrations, which represented the human body in ways inculcated by the ideals of beauty of classical antiquity, the anatomical illustrations drawn by Japanese artists reinterpreted the Western representation of the body while copying it, arriving at a form of expression that can be described as “Japanese.” In so-called contemporary art as well as aspects of popular culture like manga and animation, “Japanese” representations of the human body are attracting attention at home and abroad. When explaining this phenomenon, “flatness” is sometimes cited as one of the characteristics of Japanese painting. But what is missing from that interpretation is the existence of representations of the human body in Meiji-era anatomical illustrations. How “contemporary” is the modern anatomical illustration style of representing the human body that remains behind in these wall charts? That question lies at the heart of this exhibition.
 

 

REVIEW Post impressions

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